callmeoutis:

i was ready to just scroll past like “haha grammar humor” but then it was weird al and i,

(Source: iraffiruse, via sevenrabidpuppies)

lordhayati:


drtanner:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Holy shit. 
Bread is serious fucking business.

lordhayati:

drtanner:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Holy shit. 

Bread is serious fucking business.

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond, via jdragsky)

clevergirlhelps:

writerhelp:

One thing I’ve always noticed is how some people find it amazingly difficult to write pregnant characters. A couple of months ago I wrote a full story about a pregnancy, and I did my research. So I might be able to help.
» Make sure you want to do this
Keep in mind that a pregnancy isn’t the easiest thing in the world. It takes doctor appointments, a lot of exhaustion, sickness and, most importantly, time. If you didn’t know, it takes about nine months for a baby to be born. That’s almost 275 days. That means that you should only go on if you really want to create a baby in your story, because you can’t skip too much time - it isn’t like the movies where in one scene the lady’s finding out she’s pregnant, and in the other, she’s already in labor.Here’s a tip: if you really want to make your characters happy and thrilled with the news of baby, but you can’t afford the time and sweat that it takes to cook one, you have from 21-23 weeks to write a miscarriage.
» Pre-Pregnancy
Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the conception. Even if you don’t write any kind of smutty scenes, you should let the reader know when and where the pregnancy started.
Unprotected Sex: think about how you’re going to put this in your story. If your characters are usually responsible, they won’t simply forget wearing a condom. Think about what is going on: are they completely sane? Are they under the influence of alcohol? Are they high (which, I must say, wouldn’t exactly make your characters irresponsible - it would either get them too horny to care or even more responsible than they already are)? Or are your characters already drowned to each other in a way that they can’t think of anything else? Are they married and actually planned on having this baby? All of this will have an influence on how the pregnancy will flow, and how it will affect people around it.

Read More

clevergirlhelps:

writerhelp:

One thing I’ve always noticed is how some people find it amazingly difficult to write pregnant characters. A couple of months ago I wrote a full story about a pregnancy, and I did my research. So I might be able to help.

» Make sure you want to do this

Keep in mind that a pregnancy isn’t the easiest thing in the world. It takes doctor appointments, a lot of exhaustion, sickness and, most importantly, time. If you didn’t know, it takes about nine months for a baby to be born. That’s almost 275 days. That means that you should only go on if you really want to create a baby in your story, because you can’t skip too much time - it isn’t like the movies where in one scene the lady’s finding out she’s pregnant, and in the other, she’s already in labor.
Here’s a tip: if you really want to make your characters happy and thrilled with the news of baby, but you can’t afford the time and sweat that it takes to cook one, you have from 21-23 weeks to write a miscarriage.

» Pre-Pregnancy

Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the conception. Even if you don’t write any kind of smutty scenes, you should let the reader know when and where the pregnancy started.

Unprotected Sex: think about how you’re going to put this in your story. If your characters are usually responsible, they won’t simply forget wearing a condom. Think about what is going on: are they completely sane? Are they under the influence of alcohol? Are they high (which, I must say, wouldn’t exactly make your characters irresponsible - it would either get them too horny to care or even more responsible than they already are)? Or are your characters already drowned to each other in a way that they can’t think of anything else? Are they married and actually planned on having this baby? All of this will have an influence on how the pregnancy will flow, and how it will affect people around it.

Read More

(Source: shina-ppp)

northhelps:

After creating this guide here, I realised some more things I wanted to added in to it. There are still many stereotypes surrounding Chinese and their names, and it seem to be that whether people are a published writer or a roleplayer, they can be prone to making these…

geoffrox:

Imagine if the series had ended right after this moment.

(Source: gusfrngs, via jdragsky)

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool

(via givingcarshugs)

Anonymous said: Okai, so this may sound somewhat stupid but I'm very confused with the term "POC". So, I know characters from South America are considered PoC. Then, characters from SPAIN are too considered PoC or not? Because most part of the time people seem to forget about Spain and when they say "hispanic" they just mean Latin America. Also, Portuguese and Italian people are PoC or...? This confuses me so much, I'm so sorry.

clevergirlhelps:

You’re confusing nationality and ethnicity. Nationality is where someone lives, e.g. I’m from the US. Ethnicity is where your ancestors came from, e.g. I’m Korean and Scottish. 

POC refers to people whose ethnicity isn’t (mostly) Western European in origin. There are a number of groups within Spain - sizable populations of immigrants from Central/South America, Africa, and the Middle East (in addition to people of Middle Eastern descent who moved there during the Islamic takeover) - who are not ethnically white (POC). There are also Spaniards and immigrants from Western Europe who are ethnically white (not POC). You’ll find the same if you look at Portugal and Italy.

All the people with a Spanish citizenship are Spanish - that’s their nationality. Not all the people living within Spain are POC, because that depends on their ethnicity.

Anonymous said: How does one start a rebellion? In many stories (i.e. Eragon, Star Wars) the Chosen One JOINS a rebellion, one that already exists. Since my story takes place in the far future, I find it hard for a rebellion to form against an Empire that is omnipotent/omnipresent, with almost infinite resources, etc., without being found out and stepped on. Thanks in advance.

clevergirlhelps:

To form a rebellion, you need:

  • A group of pissed off people. Discrimination and prejudice are often causes of rebellion - get a large enough group angry enough and they will rise up. Economic loss is another motivator. One of the reasons the French Revolution began was the soaring price of the food staple, bread. Finally, a new ideology may arise that violent contradicts the existing order. The ideology’s followers may want to spread it or they may fight to preserve it.
  • A spark. Or, rather, several sparks. You need a few instances where the oppressive force does something that really riles up the population - shooting a child, denying certain people access to healthcare, an overnight fourfold increase in the bread prices - to the point at which there is a small uprising. This inspires others to do the same.
  • Organization. Organization can make or break a rebellion. At the very least, a rebellion should have a leader or four who can give orders. The rebellion also needs a core of dedicated, determined dogmatists who will stiffen the spine of the other rebels. The rebellion will need a set of values or goals 75% or more of the rebels can agree on - this is their objective.

As for your setting, you’ve worldbuilt yourself into a corner. Surely the Empire cannot have eyes absolutely everywhere. Even if they do, they won’t have enough super dedicated jingoists to watch. Many of the Empire’s employees are there for the money, not the GLORIOUS PURPOSE OF SERVING KING AND COUNTRY or whatever. There will be places where the Empire’s authority is lessened or even nominal, because it’s far from their center of power, the people have rebelled in the past, or the Empire had to strike a deal allowing them more autonomy for some reason.

(Source: paul6378)